June 26, 2018

Congratulations to Janine Marchessault (Cinema & Media Studies) and Katherine Knight (Visual Art & Art History), who recently received funding from SSHRC for new research projects engaging with archives, visual media, and artifacts.


For her SSHRC Partnership Grant, “Archive/Counter-Archive: Activating Canada’s Moving Image Heritage,” Janine Marchessault was awarded $2.499 million over six years. This partnership project is affiliated with Sensorium, and will draw on expertise from IP Osgoode, as well as the York University Libraries.

Vtape Archive (photo: Vtape)

“Four universities (York, Ryerson, Queen’s, and Concordia), numerous archival organizations and policy advocates will work collaboratively to advance counter-archival approaches. This partnership will focus on the new theoretical questions, and the methodological challenges, that attend the changing nature and political realities of visual media archives. It seeks to redress the unevenness of Canadian preservation efforts thus far by emphasizing Canada’s most vulnerable moving image heritage – women’s media; Indigenous media arts; films and media from the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual, two-spirited and queer (LGBT2Q) community; and archives from Canada’s immigrant communities.”

– read the full yFile story here


Clayton’s Punt, Summer. Photograph by Katherine Knight, 2016

Katherine Knight was awarded a SSHRC Insight Grant for “Modelling Memory,” a project that gathers visual and contextual knowledge of Maritime model ships to promote public access and awareness. Model ships will be photographed within museum collections and storage areas, in personal collections and communities, and in the landscape with found and borrowed models. Seeking to find new knowledge in the gaps between what has been collected and what remains invisible, this project views model ships as resilient artifacts that linger on after their heyday, continuing to assert presence and affecting observers.

SS America. Photograph by Katherine Knight, 2017

Modelling Memory is a timely undertaking that captures model ships at the tail end of a cultural shift where model making in general is shifting from hand to virtual modes. Using staged and documentary photography of model ships, the project reimagines the sensorial triggers behind the original impulse of the model maker. The project bridges contemporary art, archives and museum practice by creating alternate depictions of objects more normally viewed as tidy objects in glass cases, separated from their original contexts.